Bulgaria lies in Europe

Countries have different attitudes towards their flags. Take for example Poland; it’s pretty normal. Many houses have a metal appliance above the entrance of many houses in which you can stick one or two flags, usually Polish ones. It’s neat and a bit boring, but so is their flag. I already wrote about the Turkish flag-habits (they put up giant ones all around Istanbul, each of them bigger than the biggest home I’ll ever own). In Russia, every flag pole has the colours of the Russian flag around it. That’s handy, because you sometimes forget in which country you are in the middle of Siberia. It’s like one step and you’re already in the next of those tiny little states up there. Hungary has a more subtle attempt; you don’t see too many flags on the streets, but if you look out for it, you’ll realize almost everything is in the national colours green, red and white. And then, there’s Germany. For one-and-a-half years, you see barely any flag anywhere (except for as a decoration on any shop selling meat), until it’s either European or World Championship. As soon as that happens, everything is bathing in black, red, and yellow. Why is football (and meat) so important to us? Very interesting question, but the answer is too long  to write about here. Hint: I think it both has to do about the second World War.

Cliffs on the shore of Ahtopol: Small, quite, cozy.

Cliffs on the shore of Ahtopol: Small, quite, cozy.

Anyways, when I was in Bulgaria the last few days, visiting a friend, I realised something I thought to be interesting; they pair their flags with the flag of the EU. I’m a huge fan of the european idea (no war in western Europe in seventy years, quite the achievement!), so I think that’s good. But I also wondered. The area I visited was the south-eastern coastal area. This is a highly touristic countryside. Many buses wear the badge of the Union, in addition to a small line that reminds the passanger that this bus was funded by EU-money. Many flats are being built in all of the towns I saw. It’s hard to tell which of them are abandoned (like the church in Ahtopol), but I of course hope as many of them will soon be full of tourists chilling at the Black Sea. Back to the EU-flags; are they opportunism, thankfulness, or signs of true bonds to the Union? I do not know. But I’m thankful for any input.

Looking at this relievo in Burgas, you could almost forget on which side Bulgaria was during the war. Alas, Sovjet art always catches me with its simple but effective use of masculinity.

Looking at this relievo in Burgas, you could almost forget on which side Bulgaria was during the war. Alas, Sovjet art always catches me with its simple but effective use of masculinity.

What else to say about my trip? As opposed to the implication of my facebook post about a hostel in Burgas, it’s actually a nice city. I was there for few hours only, but it seems as if, additional to the beach-related fun you can have, there’s also a cultural offer. A number of museums (namely about archaeology) and a variety of operas were advertised. The inner city featues a new pedestrian area. Oh, yeah, and while buying a Bulgarian döner (french fries seem to be a standard ingredient for these), an Iranian man asked me about Hitler. It’s not always fun, but always necessary to explain that he was, in fact, not the greatest man alive. And that Germany’s current economical stability is not thanks to him.

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